John Kempf: Prioritizing On-Farm Strategies MP3

John Kempf

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In recent decades the information and knowledge base around regenerative agriculture management systems has grown very rapidly. This knowledge base is necessarily based around thinking of the entire farm as a complex ecosystem. Because of the amount of diverse and valuable information, it can be overwhelming to process everything needed to manage this system. How do we determine the priorities for our farm? Will we get the best response from remineralizing our soils? Should we consider microbial inoculants and biostimulants? Or do we ignore these until we first get our soils covered with growing plants and cover crops?

In this presentation, John will describe the relative impact of various cultural management practices and their hierarchy of importance. Nutrient and soil amendment applications, microbial products, cover crops, and other factors all have co-dependencies. Understanding these interdependencies can help us choose the products, and develop synergistic stacks, which can improve crop performance and soil health the most rapidly with the least amount of inputs.

John Kempf is a leading crop health consultant and designer of innovative soil and plant management systems. John is the Founder of Advancing Eco Agriculture, a leading crop nutrition consulting company, and a Managing Partner at Zeno Capital Partners — a investment fund working in the areas of agriculture, food production, medicine and clean energy. John is a member of the Amish community and lives in Middlefield Ohio.

58 minutes, 59 seconds (21.2 MB) 

Recorded at the 2018 Acres U.S.A. Conference, Louisville, Kentucky, Dec. 4-7, 2018.

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